thesis

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin thesis, from Ancient Greek θέσις (thesis, a proposition, a statement, a thing laid down, thesis in rhetoric, thesis in prosody)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

thesis (plural theses)

  1. A statement supported by arguments.
  2. A written essay, especially one submitted for a university degree.
    • Goldsmith
      I told them of the grave, becoming, and sublime deportment they should assume upon this mystical occasion, and read them two homilies and a thesis of my own composing, to prepare them.
  3. (logic) An affirmation, or distinction from a supposition or hypothesis.
  4. (music) The accented part of the measure, expressed by the downward beat; the opposite of arsis.
  5. (poetry) The depression of the voice in pronouncing the syllables of a word.
  6. (poetry) The part of the metrical foot upon which such a depression falls.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

thesis f (genitive thesis); third declension

  1. thesis

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative thesis thesēs
genitive thesis thesum
dative thesī thesibus
accusative thesem thesēs
ablative these thesibus
vocative thesis thesēs
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 11:39