Last modified on 25 May 2014, at 20:00

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English thew, theow, from Old English þēow, þēo (servant, slave), from Proto-Germanic *þewaz, *þegwaz (servant), from Proto-Indo-European *tekwos (runner), from Proto-Indo-European *tekw- (to run, flow). Cognate with Old High German diu (servant), Gothic [script?] (þius, bondman, slave, servant), Dutch dienen (to serve), German dienen (to serve), Old English þegn (servant, minister, vassal). See thegn, thane.

NounEdit

thew (plural thews)

  1. (obsolete) A bondman; a slave.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English thew, from Old English þēow (servile, not free, bond), from Proto-Germanic *þewaz, *þegwaz (subject, servile), from Proto-Indo-European *tekwos (runner), from Proto-Indo-European *tekw- (to run, flow). Cognate with Old High German dio (unfree).

AdjectiveEdit

thew (comparative more thew, superlative most thew)

  1. (obsolete) Bond; servile.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English thewen, from Old English þēowan, þȳwan (to press, impress, force, press on, urge on, drive, press with a weapon, thrust, pierce, stab, threaten, rebuke, subjugate, crush, push, oppress, check), from Proto-Germanic *þewjaną (to enslave, oppress), from Proto-Indo-European *tekw- (to run, flow). Cognate with Middle Dutch douwen, Middle Low German duwen, Middle High German diuhen, dūhen, diuwen (to oppress).

VerbEdit

thew (third-person singular simple present thews, present participle thewing, simple past and past participle thewed)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To oppress; enslave.

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English thew, theaw (often in plural thewes), from Old English þēaw (usage, custom, general practise of a community, mode of conduct, manner, practise, way, behaviour), from Proto-Germanic *þawwaz (custom, habit), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tāu-, *(s)te- (to stand, place). Cognate with Old Frisian thāw, Old Saxon thau (custom), Old High German *gathau, kathau (discipline).

NounEdit

thew (plural thews)

  1. Muscle or sinew.
  2. A good quality or habit; virtue.
  3. An attractive physical attribute, especially muscle; mental or moral vigour.
QuotationsEdit
  • 1602 : Hamlet by William Shakespeare, act 1 scene 3 lines 11-12-13-14
    For nature crescent does not grow alone
    In thews and bulks, but as this temple waxes,
    The inward service of the mind and soul
    Grows wide withal.
  • 1960, Thomas Pynchon, Low-Lands
    Fortune’s elf child and disinherited darling, young and randy and more a Jolly Jack Tar than anyone human could conceivably be; thews and chin taut against a sixty-knot gale with a well-broken-in briar clenched in the bright defiant teeth
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

thew (third-person singular simple present thews, present participle thewing, simple past and past participle thewed)

  1. Instruct in morals or values; chastise.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

thew

  1. Mutated form of tew.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tew dew nhew thew