Last modified on 13 July 2014, at 05:22

thirl

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English thirl, thiril, from Old English þyrel (a hole made through anything, opening, aperture, orifice, perforation), from Proto-Germanic *þurhilą (hole, opening), from Proto-Indo-European *tr̥h₂kʷelo- which is *tr̥h₂kʷe + *-lo (equivalent to through +‎ -le) from *terh₂-. Related to thrill, drill.

NounEdit

thirl (plural thirls)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) A hole, aperture, especially a nostril.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English thirlen, thurlen, thorlen, from Old English þyrlian, þyrelian (to make a hole through, pierce through, perforate; make hollow, excavate; make vain), from the noun (see above).

VerbEdit

thirl (third-person singular simple present thirls, present participle thirling, simple past and past participle thirled)

  1. To pierce, perforate, penetrate.
  2. (obsolete) To drill or bore.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Origin uncertain. Perhaps a blend of throw and hurl.

VerbEdit

thirl (third-person singular simple present thirls, present participle thirling, simple past and past participle thirled)

  1. (obsolete) To throw (a projectile).
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.8:
      And many Authours doe in this manner wound the protection of their cause, by over-rashly running against that which they take hold-of, thirling [transl. lanceant] such darts at their enemies, that might with much more advantage be cast at them.