Last modified on 8 October 2013, at 00:33

through and through

EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

through and through

  1. (idiomatic) Completely; entirely; fundamentally.
    He moved from Cincinnati to San Francisco, but he's still a Cincinnati Bengals fan, through and through.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Thus, sitting where I was, I lit my candle once more, and then clambered across that great coffin which, for two hours or more, had been a mid-wall of partition between me and danger. But to get out of the niche was harder than to get in; for now that I had a candle to light me, I saw that the coffin, though sound enough to outer view, was wormed through and through, and little better than a rotten shell. So it was that I had some ado to get over it, not daring either to kneel upon it or to bring much weight to bear with my hand, lest it should go through.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

through and through (plural through and throughs)

  1. A bullet wound in which the bullet passes through the body.