Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 13:49

tincture

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Middle English, from Latin tinctura, from the verb tingo. Compare tint, taint.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tincture (plural tinctures)

  1. A pigment or other substance that colours or dyes.
  2. A tint, or an added colour.
  3. (heraldry) A colour or metal used in the depiction of a coat of arms.
  4. An alcoholic extract of plant material, used as a medicine.
  5. (humorous) A small alcoholic drink.
  6. An essential characteristic.
    • 1924, ARISTOTLE. Metaphysics. Translated by W. D. Ross. Nashotah, Wisconsin, USA: The Classical Library, 2001. Book 1, Part 6.
      for the earlier thinkers had no tincture of dialectic
  7. The finer and more volatile parts of a substance, separated by a solvent; an extract of a part of the substance of a body communicated to the solvent.
  8. A slight taste superadded to any substance.
    a tincture of orange peel
  9. A slight quality added to anything; a tinge.
    • Alexander Pope
      All manners take a tincture from our own.
    • Macaulay
      Every man had a slight tincture of soldiership, and scarcely any man more than a slight tincture.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tincture (third-person singular simple present tinctures, present participle tincturing, simple past and past participle tinctured)

  1. to stain or impregnate (something) with colour

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

tinctūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of tinctūrus