Last modified on 9 October 2014, at 14:32

tirer

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French tirer (to draw, draw a sword), from Old French tirer (to draw, pull out with great effort, snatch violently, tear away), of uncertain origin; possibly from Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (tiran, to tear away, remove), from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear apart), from Proto-Indo-European *derə- (to tear, tear apart). Compare Italian tirare, Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish tirar. If derived from the Germanic word, cognate with Gothic 𐌳𐌹𐍃𐍄𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (distairan, to tear apart), Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐍄𐌰𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (gatairan, to tear down, remove), German zerren (to tug). Related to tear. Alternatively from a reduction of Old French martirier, from Late Latin *martyrāre.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tirer

  1. to draw, drag, pull
  2. to shoot
  3. to draw (conclusions), to consider (consequences)

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


GalloEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

tirer

  1. (transitive, agriculture) to milk (cows)

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French tirer (to draw, pull out with great effort, snatch violently, tear away), of uncertain origin; possibly from Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran, to tear away, remove), from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear apart), from Proto-Indo-European *derə- (to tear, tear apart).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

tirer

  1. to pull

ConjugationEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin; possibly from Gothic *𐍄𐌹𐍂𐌰𐌽 (*tiran, to tear away, remove), from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear apart), from Proto-Indo-European *derə- (to tear, tear apart).

VerbEdit

tirer

  1. to pull
    • circa 1210, Henri de Valenciennes, Histoire de l'empereur Henri de Constantinople
      Ne onkes li Ascres ne tira ses regnes duskes a tant k'il vint a Niké le Grant

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.