Last modified on 19 September 2014, at 13:00

tithe

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old English tēoþa (Old English underwent the Ingvaeonic nasal spirant law, which resulted in the elimination of the nasal consonant from Germanic *tehunþ-). Compare Icelandic tíund.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tithe (plural tithes)

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Wikipedia

  1. (archaic) A tenth.
  2. The tenth part of the increase arising from the profits of land and stock, allotted to the clergy for their support, as in England, or devoted to religious or charitable uses. Almost all the tithes of England and Wales are commuted by law into rent charges. Concept originates in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament).
  3. A contribution to one's religious community or congregation of worship.
  4. A small part or proportion.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdjectiveEdit

tithe (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Tenth.
    • Shakespeare
      Every tithe soul, 'mongst many thousand.

VerbEdit

tithe (third-person singular simple present tithes, present participle tithing, simple past and past participle tithed)

  1. (transitive) To collect a tithe.
  2. (intransitive) To pay a tithe.
  3. (transitive) To levy a tenth part on; to tax to the amount of a tenth.
    • Bible, Luke xi. 42
      Ye tithe mint and rue.

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈtʲɪhə]
  • (Connemara) IPA(key): [ˈtʲɪhə], [ˈtʲiː]

NounEdit

tithe m

  1. plural form of teach
  2. housing

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tithe thithe dtithe
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.