Last modified on 23 May 2014, at 22:05

trompe-d'œil

See also: trompe d'œil

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A misconstruction of trompe-l’œil on French roots: trompe (deceives) + d’ (of) + œil (eye).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trompe-d’œil

  1. common misconstruction of trompe-l’œil
    • ante 1934: R. Fry, Last Lectures, page 207 (1939 publication)
      The carefully exposed reflection of the fallen soldier in the retina of his shield, which is very much in agreement with the puerile stories of trompe-d’œil—like that of the ‘Grapes of Zeuxis’—which were the stock in trade of art critics like Pliny.