Last modified on 25 May 2014, at 20:39

trooper

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From troop +‎ -er, from French troupe.

Sense of cavalry soldier attested 1640, mounted policeman 1858 (Australia), state policeman 1911 (US). The sense of "one who endures adversity" comes from English trouper (member of an acting troupe), 1959, but through assimilation with the sense of "soldier" has come to be usually spelled "trooper".

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trooper (plural troopers)

  1. (military) A soldier of private rank in cavalry or armour. Abbreviated Tpr.
  2. A cavalry horse; charger.
  3. A soldier.
  4. (UK) A troopship.
  5. (US) A state trooper.
  6. One who endures adversity or hardship with an attitude of stoicism and persistence.
    He was a real trooper about taking care of the kids for the weekend.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “trooper” in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 2004.
  • troop” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  • troupe” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AnagramsEdit