Last modified on 19 July 2014, at 07:42
See also: Tur, TUR, tür, Tür, tùr, túr, Túr, and tűr

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian тур (tur).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tur (plural turs)

  1. A species of wild goat, Capra caucasica, native to the western Caucasus.
    • 2007, Michael Chabon, Gentlemen of the Road, Sceptre 2008, page 90:
      Then to Hanukkah's mild surprise a voice rose up and, with laconic precision, likened this rumored brother Alp to the secretion on the nether parts of a she-tur.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *turъ (Old Church Slavonic тоуръ (turŭ)), from Proto-Indo-European *táwros.

NounEdit

tur m

  1. bovine

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French tour (go, turn).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tuːr/, [tˢuɐ̯ˀ]

NounEdit

tur c (singular definite turen, plural indefinite ture)

  1. walk, stroll
  2. outing, excursion
  3. trip, tour, flight
  4. ride, drive, run
  5. turn

InflectionEdit

External linksEdit

VerbEdit

tur

  1. Imperative of ture.

LatvianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See turēt

VerbEdit

tur

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of turēt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of turēt
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of turēt
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of turēt

Etymology 2Edit

Traditionally, tur is derived from kur (where) by analogy with pairs like kas (who, what) : tas (that), (how) : (thus, like that). A more recent suggestion is that tur may come from Proto-Baltic *tur, from the zero grade *tr̥ of Proto-Indo-European *ter-, the source of several nouns, adverbs or prepositions meaning “through,” “across,” “away”: German durch (through) (compare Old High German duruh, from *tr̥-kʷe), Breton treu (beyond), dre (through) (*tre), Latin trāns (over, across, beyond). The meaning in Latvian would have been changed to “there” under the influence of kur.[1]

PronunciationEdit

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AdverbEdit

tur

  1. used to indicate an unnamed location relatively far from the speaker; there, in that place
    kas tur ir? — who is there?
    tur augšā — up there
    redzi, tur tā ir bumbiere!... bet tur - divas ābeles! — look, there, that is a pear tree!... and there - two apple trees!
  2. used to refer back to a previously mentioned location, or to a place to be mentioned in a following subordinate clause; there
    mašīna iebrauca pagalmā un tur apstājās — the car came into the courtyard and stopped there
    zēnam negribējās iet atpakaļ uz māju; tur tagad tumšs... — the boy didn't want to go back to the house; there (it was) now dark...
    arī es esmu tur, kur stāvēja mājas — I, too, am there, where the house(s) were (= used to be)
  3. used to refer to a situation, state, event, which is connected, often indirectly, to the speaker
    droši vien Toms arī labi pelna, bet viesnīcu dzīve un ceļojumi ir dārgi; tur maz kas var palikt pāri... — Toms probably earns well (= enough money), but a life of hotels and trips is expensive; there only little (money) can be left...
    māt, neej tumsā, neej, māt! tur nav neviena paša klāt... — mother, don't go in the dark, don't go, mother! there is nobody present there...
  4. used to indicate an unnamed location, relatively far from the speaker, as the target of motion; there, thither, to that place
    viņi gāja tur visi trīs, kā toreiz, šurpu uz ciemu nākot — they went there, all three of them, like that time, coming here to the village
    laiva peldēja nevis tur, kur es gribēju, uz augšu... bet slīdēja pa straumi lēni lejup — the ship went not there, where I wanted, upstream... but slided slowly down the stream

ParticleEdit

tur

  1. used to reinforce the meaning of a word or utterance
    bet, vai par augstāko kungu skaitās Varšava vai Pēterburga... kāda gan tur atšķirība? — but, if (we) count Warsaw or (St.) Petersburg as (our) supreme lord... what difference there (= does it make)?
    savādi ar tiem pieradumiem: rokas un kājas pašas kust, kur vienmēr kustējušas, ka tur vai pasaules gals — strage, those habits: the hands and legs move by themselves where they always moved, that there (= even if it is) the end of the world
SynonymsEdit
  • (of target of motion): turp
AntonymsEdit
  • (of place): šeit, te
  • (of situation, state, event): te
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “tur” in Konstantīns Karulis (1992, 2001), Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (Rīga: AVOTS) ISBN: 9984-700-12-7.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

tur

  1. rafsi of stura.

Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *turъ, from Proto-Indo-European *táwros. Cognate with Upper Sorbian tur, Polish tur, Czech tur, Russian тур (tur), and Old Church Slavonic тоуръ (turŭ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tur m

  1. aurochs (Bos primigenius)

DeclensionEdit

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin turris

NounEdit

tur f (oblique plural turs, nominative singular tur, nominative plural turs)

  1. tower

PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *turъ (Old Church Slavonic тоуръ (turŭ)), from Proto-Indo-European *táwros.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tur m

  1. aurochs, urus

DeclensionEdit


RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French tour.

NounEdit

tur m (plural tururi)

  1. tour
  2. round
  3. saunter
  4. stroll
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Uncertain. Probably from Serbo-Croatian tur. Other less likely theories suggest a link with stur, or Latin thylacus, from Ancient Greek θύλαϰος.

NounEdit

tur m (plural turi)

  1. pants bottom
  2. lap
See alsoEdit

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sursilvan, Puter, Vallader) tuor
  • (Surmiran) tor

EtymologyEdit

From Latin turris.

NounEdit

tur m (plural turs)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan) tower

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *turъ (Old Church Slavonic тоуръ (turŭ)), from Proto-Indo-European *táwros.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tȗr m (Cyrillic spelling ту̑р)

  1. aurochs, urus
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Ottoman Turkish [script?] (oturmak, to sit).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tȗr m (Cyrillic spelling ту̑р)

  1. buttocks
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • tur” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • tur” in Hrvatski jezični portal

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French tour, used in Swedish since 1639 in the sense of a journey, since 1679 in the sense of a sequence of events (to take turns), since 1809 in the sense of luck (events that luckily go your way).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tur c

  1. a tour; a journey through a building, estate, country etc.
    John tog en tur med bilen för att titta på hela stan innan han bestämde sig för att bosätta sig i just den stadsdelen
    1. a bus on a specific line, which leaves at a specific time
      De drog in de två sista turerna på söndagskvällarna eftersom ändå ingen åkte med bussen vid den tiden
      They canceled the last two buses on Sunday afternoons, as nobody took the bus at that time anyway.
    2. a dance; an instance of dancing
      Vi tog två turer på dansgolvet innan vi gick hem
      We danced two dances before we went home
  2. a turn; the chance to use an item shared in sequence with others
    Nu har du fått ha den jättelänge, så nu är det min tur
    Now you've had it for a really long time, now it's my turn
    Det är din tur
    It's your move
  3. (uncountable) luck
    Du måste ha väldig tur om du ska vinna lotterier
    You've got to have a lot of luck if you're to win the lottery

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

journey
turn
luck

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit