Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 04:58

tympanum

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tympanum, from Ancient Greek τύμπανον (túmpanon), from τύπτω (túptō, I strike, I hit).

NounEdit

tympanum (plural tympanums or tympana)

  1. (architecture) A triangular space between the sides of a pediment.
  2. (architecture) The space within an arch, and above a lintel or a subordinate arch, spanning the opening below the arch.
  3. The middle ear.
  4. The eardrum.
  5. A hearing organ in frogs, toads and some insects.
  6. (engineering) A drum-shaped wheel with spirally curved partitions by which water is raised to the axis when the wheel revolves with the lower part of the circumference submerged; used for raising water, as for irrigation.

QuotationsEdit

  • 2005, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury Publishing, paperback, page 9
    It was a black-and-white picture of a Romanesque doorway, with flanking saints and a lively Last Judgement in the tympanum [...].

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek τύμπανον (túmpanon), from τύπτω (túptō, I strike, beat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tympanum n (genitive tympanī); second declension

  1. drum, timbrel, tambour, tambourine

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative tympanum tympana
genitive tympanī tympanōrum
dative tympanō tympanīs
accusative tympanum tympana
ablative tympanō tympanīs
vocative tympanum tympana