Last modified on 21 June 2014, at 15:13

upstand

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English upstanden, equivalent to up- +‎ stand. Cognate with Dutch opstaan (to rise, stand up), German aufstehen (to arise, get up, stand up), Swedish uppstå (to arise, emerge, come up).

VerbEdit

upstand (third-person singular simple present upstands, present participle upstanding, simple past and past participle upstood)

  1. (intransitive) To stand up; arise; be erect; rise.
    • 1820, Homer, William Cowper, The Iliad of Homer: translated into English blank verse, with notes:
      At once, upstood the monarch, and upstood The wise Ulysses.
    • 1912, United States. Patent Office, Official gazette of the United States Patent Office: Volume 174:
      The combination with a closet seat, of a flexible mat having sockets, plates secured upon the seat and having recesses, and a standard pivoted upon each plate and fold- able to lie in the respective socket or to upstand from the seat , ...
    • 2010, Lonnie R. Sherrod, Judith Torney-Purta, Constance A. Flanagan, Handbook of Research on Civic Engagement in Youth:
      Put differently, attention to norms and rules did not increase the likelihood that a student would choose to upstand or intervene. Students who were more likely to recommend direct support for the victim (choosing to upstand), however , ...

Related termsEdit

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NounEdit

upstand (plural upstands)

  1. (construction, plumbing) A section of a roof covering or flashing which turns up against a vertical surface.

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