Last modified on 8 October 2014, at 16:27

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English user, equivalent to use +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

user (plural users)

  1. One who uses or makes use of something, a consumer.
    • 2013 July 20, “Out of the gloom”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8845: 
      [Rural solar plant] schemes are of little help to industry or other heavy users of electricity. Nor is solar power yet as cheap as the grid. For all that, the rapid arrival of electric light to Indian villages is long overdue. When the national grid suffers its next huge outage, as it did in July 2012 when hundreds of millions were left in the dark, look for specks of light in the villages.
  2. A person who uses drugs, especially illegal drugs.
  3. (computing) A person who uses a computer or a computing network, especially a person who has received a user account.
  4. (pejorative) An exploiter, an abusive user (a person who uses something or someone unfairly, selfishly and/or unethically).

AntonymsEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • (one that unfairly takes advantage of or exploits): parasite

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin uso.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

user

  1. to wear, wear down, wear off, wear out, grind down, run in
    Trois kilomètres à pied, ça use les souliers.
  2. to use
    Ne m'obligez pas à user de la force.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


GalloEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūsus, past participle of ūtor, ūtī (use, employ).

VerbEdit

user

  1. (transitive, cooking) to boil down

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *unseraz (of us, our), from Proto-Indo-European *no-s-ero- (our). Cognate with Old Frisian ūse(r) (our), Old Saxon ūser (our), Old High German unsēr, unsār (our), Gothic 𐌿𐌽𐍃𐌰𐍂 (unsar, our), Old English ūs (us).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ūser (possessive)

  1. our, belonging to us

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ūtor.

VerbEdit

user

  1. to use; to employ; to make use of

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ss, *-st are modified to s, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.