Last modified on 11 September 2014, at 00:59

utterance

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From utter +‎ -ance[1]

NounEdit

utterance (plural utterances)

  1. An act of uttering.
  2. Something spoken.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 13, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “[…] They talk of you as if you were Croesus—and I expect the beggars sponge on you unconscionably.” And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 237a.
      To know how one should express oneself in saying or judging that there really are falsehoods without getting caught up in contradiction by such an utterance: that's extremely difficult, Theaetetus.
  3. The ability to speak.
  4. Manner of speaking.
    • Bible, Acts ii. 4
      They [] began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance.
    • John Keats
      O, how unlike / To that large utterance of the early gods!
    He has a good utterance.
  5. (obsolete) Sale by offering to the public.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) Putting in circulation.
    the utterance of false coin, or of forged notes
QuotationsEdit
  • Mathematics and Poetry are... the utterance of the same power of imagination, only that in the one case it is addressed to the head, in the other, to the heart. — Thomas Hill
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French oultrance.

NounEdit

utterance (plural utterances)

  1. (now literary) The utmost extremity (of a fight etc.).

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ utterance in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

External linksEdit