See also: VAST and väst

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vastus (void, immense).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vast (comparative vaster or more vast, superlative vastest or most vast)

  1. Very large or wide (literally or figuratively).
    The Sahara desert is vast.
    There is a vast difference between them.
  2. Very great in size, amount, degree, intensity, or especially extent.
    • 2012 March-April, Anna Lena Phillips, “Sneaky Silk Moths”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 2, page 172: 
      Last spring, the periodical cicadas emerged across eastern North America. Their vast numbers and short above-ground life spans inspired awe and irritation in humans—and made for good meals for birds and small mammals.
  3. (obsolete) Waste; desert; desolate; lonely.
    • William Shakespeare, the Life and Death of Richard the Third Act I, scene IV:
      the empty, vast, and wandering air

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

vast (plural vasts)

  1. (poetic) A vast space.
    • 1608: they have seemed to be together, though absent, shook hands, as over a vast, and embraced, as it were, from the ends of opposed winds. — William Shakespeare, The Winter's Tale, I.i

Derived termsEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch vast, from Old Dutch fast, from Proto-Germanic *fastuz, from Proto-Indo-European *pasto- (solid).

Cognate via Germanic with Low German fast, English fast, German fest, West Frisian fêst, Danish fast, Norwegian fast, and Swedish fast, Icelandic (and Faroese) fastur. Cognate via Proto-Indo-European with Armenian հաստ (hast, thick) and Sanskrit पस्त्य (pastyá).

AdjectiveEdit

vast (comparative vaster, superlative meest vast or vastst)

  1. firm, fast, tight
  2. fixed, not moving or changing
    vaste lasten
    fixed costs
  3. stuck, unable to get out
  4. (chemistry) in the solid state
  5. (botany) perennial
  6. (of a telephone) using a landline

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

vast

  1. surely, certainly
  2. (informal, sarcastically) sure, yeah, right
    Mijn hond heeft mijn huiswerk opgegeten.Ja, vast!
    My dog ate my homework. — Yeah, right!

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

vast

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of vasten
  2. imperative of vasten

RomaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps (unlikely, as the 'st' in Sanskrit would definitely have shifted to 'tt' or 't') from Sanskrit हस्त (hasta), from Proto-Indo-Iranian, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰés-to- (hand) < *ǵʰes-. Compare Punjabi ਹਸਤ (hast), Hindi हाथ (hāth), Bengali হাত (hat); cf. also Persian دست (dast).

NounEdit

vast m (plural vast)

  1. hand
Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 07:01