Last modified on 29 August 2013, at 02:18

veridical

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin veridicus (truly said), from verus (true) and dīcō (I say).

AdjectiveEdit

veridical (comparative more veridical, superlative most veridical)

  1. True.
  2. Pertaining to an experience, perception, or interpretation that accurately represents reality; as opposed to imaginative, unsubstantiated, illusory, or delusory.
    Few believe that all claimed religious experiences are veridical.
    • 1995, Herbert Simon, "Guest Editorial", Public Administration Review, vol. 55, no. 5, p. 404:
      There was great need for empirical research that would build a more veridical description of organizations and management.

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