Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 18:07

viaticum

EnglishEdit

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 Viaticum on Wikipedia

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Latin viāticum (travelling-money, provisions for a journey), from viāticus (of a road or journey), from via (road).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

viaticum (plural viatica)

  1. The Eucharist, when given to a person who is dying or one in danger of death.
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p. 37:
      from Anglo-Saxon times there had been a deep conviction that to receive the viaticum was a virtual death sentence which would make subsequent recovery impossible.
  2. Provisions, money, or other supplies given to someone setting off on a long journey (often figurative).
    • 1885, Sir Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 20:
      Towards night-fall he entered a town called Sa’adiyah where he alighted and took out somewhat of his viaticum and ate
    • 1971, Anthony Burgess, M/F, Penguin 2004, p. 184:
      That viaticum I had been made to drink had undoubtedly been spiked with cantharides or something

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From viāticus (of a road or journey), from via (road).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

viāticum n (genitive viāticī); second declension

  1. travelling-money; provision for a journey
  2. (figuratively) a journey
  3. resources; means
  4. money made abroad, especially as a soldier, or used to travel abroad

InflectionEdit

Second declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative viāticum viātica
genitive viāticī viāticōrum
dative viāticō viāticīs
accusative viāticum viātica
ablative viāticō viāticīs
vocative viāticum viātica

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • viaticum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879