Last modified on 2 August 2014, at 23:01
See also: víg

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Abbreviation of vigorish.

NounEdit

vig (plural vigs)

  1. (slang) A charge taken on bets, as by a bookie or gambling establishment.
    • 2009, Wayne L. Winston, Mathletics: How Gamblers, Managers, and Sports Enthusiasts Use Mathematics, page 256,
      The bookmaker's mean profit per dollar bet is called vigorish or “the vig.” In our example, 11 + 11 = $22 is bet, and the bookmaker wins $1 so the vig is 1/22 = 4.5%.
  2. (slang) Interest from a loan shark's loan.
    • 1973, Martin Scorsese, Mardik Martin (screenplay), Mean Streets, quoted in 2009, Ellis Cashmore, Martin Scorsese's America, page 118,
      “You charged a guy from the neighborhood $1800 vig?” he asks incredulously (“vig” is short for vigorish, meaning a rate of interest from a loan from an illegal moneylender).
    • 2005, F. P. Lione, The Crossroads, Midtown Blue Book #2, page 100,
      The guy was probably professional muscle, a leg breaker who collects vig for a loan shark. (Vig is a mob term for interest on loans to a loan shark.)
  3. A commission, finder's fee, or similar extra charge.

SynonymsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *uig-, from Proto-Indo-European *u(e)i-K- 'to revolve, turn, twist'. Cognate to Old English wice (patch) and Old Norse vik (bight)[1].

NounEdit

vig m (indefinite plural vigje, definite singular vigu, definite plural vigjet)

  1. stretcher, litter, bier, transition (consisting of beams)
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.418

SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

vig

  1. imperative of viga.


AdjectiveEdit

vig (comparative vigare, superlative vigast)

  1. (of a person) limber, supple

VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vig (plural vigs)

  1. week
  2. sennight, sevennight

DeclensionEdit