Last modified on 3 August 2014, at 03:18

village

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Middle French village, from Latin villaticus, ultimately from Latin villa (English villa).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

village (plural villages)

  1. A rural habitation of size between a hamlet and a town.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 1, The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      [] belts of thin white mist streaked the brown plough land in the hollow where Appleby could see the pale shine of a winding river. Across that in turn, meadow and coppice rolled away past the white walls of a village bowered in orchards, []
    • 2013 June 29, “High and wet”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 28: 
      Floods in northern India, mostly in the small state of Uttarakhand, have wrought disaster on an enormous scale. The early, intense onset of the monsoon on June 14th swelled rivers, washing away roads, bridges, hotels and even whole villages.
    There are 2 churches and 3 shops in our village.
  2. (UK) A rural habitation that has a church, but no market.
  3. (Australia) A planned community such as a retirement community or shopping district.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin villaticus, from villa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

village m (plural villages)

  1. village

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

village m (plural villages)

  1. village