Last modified on 13 January 2014, at 18:04

vom

See also: VOM and vòm

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortening.

NounEdit

vom (uncountable)

  1. (informal) vomit

VerbEdit

vom (third-person singular simple present voms, present participle vomming, simple past and past participle vommed)

  1. (informal) vomit
    • 1998, Robert McLiam Wilson, Ripley Bogle (page 185)
      Bogle the diplomat tried to hide the sound of his gagging as he vommed the night away.
    • 2010, Ross O'Carroll-Kelly, Rhino What You Did Last Summer
      Then the waft of puke and stale bourbon reaches my nostrils and I get that shorp[sic] taste in my mouth that you get when you know you're going to vom.

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vomō. Compare Daco-Romanian voame, vom.

VerbEdit

vom (past participle vumutã)

  1. I vomit.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vǫmb.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vom c (singular definite vommen, plural indefinite vomme)

  1. belly
  2. paunch

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

ContractionEdit

vom (+ adjective ending with -em + masculine or neuter noun)

  1. from the, of the; about the (contraction of von + dem)

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

(noi) vom (modal auxiliary; first-person plural form of vrea, used with infinitives to form future indicative tenses)

  1. (we) will
    Vom lua prânzul la ora douăsprezece.
    We will have lunch at 12 o'clock.

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English woman (woman (truncated) > wom > vom)

NounEdit

vom (plural voms)

  1. woman (adult female human)

DeclensionEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

HypernymsEdit

Derived termsEdit