Last modified on 2 June 2014, at 00:29

welthe

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

welthe

  1. obsolete spelling of wealth
    • 1474, Caxton, Game and Playe of the Chesse[1]:
      And an enuyous man hath no vertue in hymself/ for he corrumpeth hymself for as moche as he hateth allway the welthe and vertues of other/ and thus ought they to kepe them that they take none euyll suspec[=o]n For a man naturally whan his affection hath suspecion in ony man that he weneth that he doth/ hit semeth to hym verily that it is doon.
    • c. 1500, Anonymous, A Chronicle of London from 1089 to 1483[2]:
      Whan Charyte ys chosen with stats to stonde, Stedfast and styll, with oute distaunce, Then wreth may be exilid out of thys londe, And God oure gide to have governaunce; Wysdom and welthe with all plesaunce, May ryghtfulle reigne, and prosperite, For love hath underleyde wrethfull vengeaunce; Reioyse Enlond the lords acordid bee.
    • 1874, Alexander Barclay, The Ship of Fools, Volume 1[3]:
      He wrote and ordeyned lawes moste egal and iust He edityed vnto the Grekes a comon welthe stable, quyet and commendable.