Last modified on 21 September 2014, at 18:26

whistle

EnglishEdit

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A whistle (1)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English whistlen; Old English hwistlan, from Proto-Germanic *hwistlōną.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

whistle (plural whistles)

  1. A device designed to be placed in the mouth in order, or driven by steam or otherwise, to make a whistling sound.
  2. An act of whistling.
  3. A shrill, high-pitched sound made by whistling.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 5, The Celebrity:
      We expressed our readiness, and in ten minutes were in the station wagon, rolling rapidly down the long drive, for it was then after nine. [] As we reached the lodge we heard the whistle, and we backed up against one side of the platform as the train pulled up at the other.
  4. Any high-pitched sound similar to the sound made by whistling.
    the whistle of the wind in the trees
  5. (Cockney rhyming slang) A suit (from whistle and flute).
    • 2005, Wally Payne, A Minority of One: A Monkey's Tale Continued
      We soldiers changed into our No.1 dress uniforms, Sid into his best whistle and we set off for the church.
  6. The mouth and throat; so called as being the organs of whistling.
    • Walton
      Let's drink the other cup to wet our whistles.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

whistle (third-person singular simple present whistles, present participle whistling, simple past and past participle whistled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To make a shrill, high-pitched sound by forcing air through the mouth. To produce a whistling sound, restrictions to the flow of air are created using the teeth, tongue and lips.
    Never whistle at a funeral.
    She was whistling a happy tune.
  2. (intransitive) To move in such a way as to create a whistling sound.
    A bullet whistled past.
  3. (transitive) To send, signal, or call by a whistle.
    • Addison
      He chanced to miss his dog; we stood still till he had whistled him up.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit