Last modified on 16 June 2013, at 23:09

white Christmas

EnglishEdit

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NounEdit

white Christmas (plural white Christmases)

  1. A Christmas Day on which there is a ground covering of snow.
    • 1905, Annie Fellows Johnston, The Little Colonel′s Christmas Vacation, ch. 8,
      “It′s like frozen thistle-down!” she cried. “I hope it will snow all day and all night until everything is covered. I never saw a white Christmas.”
    • 1945 December 31, The Big Snow, Life, page 23,
      In New York City 10,000 men struggled to clear away the heavy snow which promised New Yorkers their first white Christmas in 15 years, [] .
    • 2008 December 18, David Bruser, “Thanks to more storms, Christmas may be white,” Toronto Star, p. A2,
      At Environment Canada, senior climatologist David Phillips′ standard for a white Christmas calls for at least two centimeters of snow on the ground at 7 a.m. . . . “In England, if a weather guy sees a snowflake, they call it a white Christmas.”
  2. (Australia, food) A sweet food item made from dried fruits and nuts mixed with copha or white chocolate or similar sweet white binding and allowed to set in a tray to make slices. [1]
    • 2006, R.I.C. Publications, An Aussie Christmas, page 46,
      This popular white Christmas slice has been given an Aussie flavour and named after the sulphur-crested cockatoo.
    • 2008, Lee-Ann Holmes, Rhymes for big rascals, R.I.C. Publications, page 74,
      Describe the changes CophaTM (a shortening agent derived from coconut flesh) makes to the mixture when making White Christmas slice.
    • 2011, Sally Wise, Leftover Makeovers: Quick and Fabulous Food From Your Fridge and Pantry, unnumbered page,
      This version is richer and creamier than regular White Christmas slice.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2005 December 12, White Christmas slice (recipe), Australian Broadcasting Corporation - Radio - Mid North Coast New South Wales, (retrieved 18 Dec. 2008).