Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 19:16

whitewash

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From white + wash

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

whitewash (plural whitewashes)

  1. A lime and water mixture for painting walls and fences bright white.
    • 1952: For walls plaster gave a smooth white surface; or if it was not sufficiently white, or had become discoloured, it could be brightened up with a coat of whitewash or paint. — L.F. Salzman, Building in England, p. 157.
  2. (sports) A complete victory or series of victories without suffering any losses; a clean sweep.
    • 2010, Andrew Miller, Cricinfo:
      For the first time in a long time, Australia are being threatened with the prospect of a 5-0 whitewash
  3. (obsolete) Any liquid composition for whitening something, such as a wash for making the skin fair.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

whitewash (third-person singular simple present whitewashes, present participle whitewashing, simple past and past participle whitewashed)

  1. To paint over with a lime and water mixture so as to brighten up a wall or fence.
    The houses looked very bright when they whitewashed the whole neighborhood.
  2. (idiomatic) To cover over errors or bad actions.
    In his sermon, the minister didn't try to whitewash over the sins of his church.
  3. (dated, transitive) To repay the financial debts of (another person).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers to this entry?)
  4. (baseball, slang, dated, late, 19th century, archaic) To prevent a team from scoring any runs.
  5. (acting) To choose white film or television actors to portray characters that were Asian, African, or other races.
  6. (pejorative) To make over (an Asian, African, or person of another race, especially a woman) to look Caucasian.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit