whither

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hwæder.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

whither (not comparable)

  1. (literary or archaic) To which place.
    • 1918, Willa Cather, My Antonia, Mirado Modern Classics, paperback edition, page 8
      The wagon jolted on, carrying me I knew not whither.
    • 1611, King James BibleWikisource, John 8:14:
      Jesus answered and said unto them, Though I bear record of myself, yet my record is true: for I know whence I came, and whither I go; but ye cannot tell whence I come, and whither I go.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, “The Sea-chest”, in Treasure IslandWikisource:
      [W]hat greatly encouraged me, it was in an opposite direction from that whence the blind man had made his appearance and whither he had presumably returned.
    • 1885, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, Penguin Red Classics, paperback edition, page 24
      And with the same grave countenance he hurried through his breakfast and drove to the police station, whither the body had been carried.

Usage notesEdit

  • This word is unusual in modern usage; where is much more common. It is more often encountered in older works, or when used poetically.
  • Do not confuse with whether or wither.

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

whither (third-person singular simple present whithers, present participle whithering, simple past and past participle whithered)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete, dialectal) To wuther.
Last modified on 15 April 2014, at 21:13