Last modified on 26 May 2014, at 22:26

withgo

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English withgon (to be in opposition to, vanish), from Old English wiþgān (to go against, oppose, pass away, vanish, disappear), equivalent to with- +‎ go.

VerbEdit

withgo (third-person singular simple present withgoes, present participle withgoing, simple past withwent, past participle withgone)

  1. (transitive) To go against; oppose; transgress.
    • 1903, John Henry Overton, The nonjurors: their lives, principles, and writings:
      Bisbie, being then in the 55th year of his age, and 30th year of his incumbency, by vertue of an unrighteous Act of a factious and rebellious convention, was deprived of the rectory of Long Melford for not withgoing his faith and sworn allegiance to King James the Second and transferring it to William, Prince of Orange.
  2. (transitive) To forgo; give up; pass up; forfeit.
    • 1895, Aroda Reym, A life contrast:
      "[...] In the name of all that is dear to you, let us help you to withgo the vengeance."
    • 1914, Australia. Parliament, Parliamentary debates: Senate and House of Representatives:
      It has been reported in the newspapers that in South Australia several women who could afford to withgo the allowance have drawn £5, and contributed the money to the funds of the Liberal party.
    • 1946, Traffic Service Corporation, Traffic world:
      Operators in areas outside Chicago were urged to withgo experiments with radio truck communication until the experiment in Chicago had proved the practicability and efficiency of such a highway communication program.
    • 1957, William Hollow Husband, James Carlton Dockeray, Modern corporation finance:
      Thus, many railroads have been forced to withgo the payment of dividends in recent years while established industrial companies were able to return to a dividend schedule following the curtailment of the early thirties.
    • 2001, Richard Grassby, Kinship and Capitalism:
      Abraham Gonsales, when his daughter died, wrote how it had "pleased God to take her from this miserable world ... it has caused us a great deal of grief and sorrow . . . give us strength to withgo so much sorrow for it has touched out hearts.