Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 23:24

wobble

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wobble (plural wobbles)

  1. An unsteady motion.
    The fat man walked down the street with a wobble.
    • 2011 October 29, Neil Johnston, “Norwich 3 - 3 Blackburn”, BBC Sport:
      That should have been that, but Hart caught a dose of the Hennessey wobbles and spilled Adlene Guedioura's long-range shot.
  2. A tremulous sound.
    There was a wobble on her high notes.
  3. (music) A low-frequency oscillation sometimes used in dubstep

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

wobble (third-person singular simple present wobbles, present participle wobbling, simple past and past participle wobbled)

  1. (intransitive) To move with an uneven or rocking motion, or unsteadily to and fro.
    • 2013 July 6, “The rise of smart beta”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8843, page 68: 
      Investors face a quandary. Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries; government-bond yields may have risen in recent weeks but they are still unattractive. Equities have suffered two big bear markets since 2000 and are wobbling again. It is hardly surprising that pension funds, insurers and endowments are searching for new sources of return.
    the Earth wobbles slowly on its axis;  the jelly wobbled on the plate
  2. (intransitive) To tremble or quaver.
    The soprano's voice wobbled alarmingly.
  3. (intransitive) To vacillate in one's opinions.
    I'm wobbling between the Liberals and the Greens.
  4. (transitive) To cause to wobble.
    The boy wobbled the girl's bike.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit