EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wole

  1. Obsolete spelling of whole.
    • 1872, William Still, The Underground Railroad[1]:
      I war sory to hear that My brother war sol i am glad that i did come away when i did god works all the things for the Best he is young he may get a long in the wole May god Bless hem ef you have any News from Petersburg Va Plas Rite me a word when you anser this Letter and ef any person came form home Letter Me know.
    • 1685, Robert May, The accomplisht cook[2]:
      To make Pig Brawn Take a white or red Pig, for a spotted one is not so handsome, take a good large fat one, and being scalded and drawn bone it whole, but first cut off the head and the hinder quarters, (and leave the bone in the hinder quarters) the rest being boned cut it into 2 collars overwart both the sides, or bone the wole Pig but only the head: then wash them in divers-waters, and let it soak in clean water two hours, the bloud being well soaked out, take them and dry the collars in a clean cloth, and season them in the inside with minced lemon-peel and salt, roul them up, & put them into fine clean clouts, but first make your collars very equal at both ends, round and even, bind them up at the ends and middle hard & close with packthred; then let your Pan boil, and put in the collars, boil them with water and salt, and keep it filled up with warm water as you do the brawn, scum off the fat very clean, and being tender boil'd put them in a hoop as deep as the collar, bind it and frame it even, being cold put it into your souce drink made of whey and salt, or oatmeal boil'd and strained, then put them in a pipkin or little barrel, and stop them close from the air.

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wole

  1. locative singular of woł
Last modified on 19 March 2014, at 12:43