Last modified on 31 May 2014, at 01:24

wontly

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From wont +‎ -ly.

AdverbEdit

wontly (comparative wontlier or more wontly, superlative wontliest or most wontly)

  1. Usually; customarily; habitually.
    • 1807, Samuel Comyn, A treatise of the law relative to contracts and agreements not under Seal:
      But third persons, merely for the purpose of laying a wager, shall not thus wontly expose others to ridicule, and libel them under the form of an action.
    • 1929, George Bryan (vicar of Huttoft.), The dying Christian, a poem:
      That words were vain which would reveal His workings of amaze and zeal; But, when again his breast the tone Assumed which wontly seemed its own, [...]
    • 1974, Kansas Bar Association, The Journal of the Kansas Bar Association:
      [...] rights violations against the Governor, Adjutant General of the National Guard, guard officials and enlisted members, and the university president for "intentionally, recklessly, willfully and wontly" causing the students' death.