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Ancient GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier *ḱónsmos, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱens- or *ḱems-, "to put in order". Related to Latin cēnseō (to estimate) and Sanskrit शंसति (śaṃsati, to commend, praise).[1]

PronunciationEdit

 

NounEdit

κόσμος (kósmosm (genitive κόσμου); second declension (Epic, Attic, Ionic, Doric, Koine)

  1. order
  2. lawful order, government
  3. mode, fashion
  4. ornament, decoration
  5. honour, credit
  6. ruler
  7. world, universe, the earth
  8. mankind

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 759-760

Further readingEdit


GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek κόσμος (kósmos).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈko.zmos/
  • Hyphenation: κό‧σμος

NounEdit

κόσμος (kósmosm (plural κόσμοι)

  1. (astronomy) Universe, cosmos
  2. world; planet Earth
    1. (figuratively) an imaginary world
      See expressions
    2. (figuratively) one's own, inner world
      Ζει σε άλλον κόσμο!!Zei se állon kósmo!!He lives in another world!!
      Derivative: (ironic, augmentative) κοσμάρα f (kosmára)
  3. (collective, in the singular) society, people, the masses
    Δεν φταίει ο κόσμος, φταίνε οι πολιτικοί.Den ftaíei o kósmos, ftaíne oi politikoí.It is not the fault of the people, it is the politicians' fault.
    (expression) όλος ο κόσμος ― ólos o kósmos ― everybody
    See more expressions
    Derivative: (pejorative) κοσμάκης m (kosmákis)
  4. a group of people (geographically, historically, socially)
    O Ρωμαϊκός κόσμοςO Romaïkós kósmosThe Roman world (the Romans, the Roman civilization)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

(with prefixes): κοσμο-, κοσμό-, κοσμ-
(figuratively):

(collective):

And see derivatives of inherited ancient words:

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit