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ArabicEdit

EtymologyEdit

Eventually from Proto-Semitic *zaman-, from the root ز م ن(z-m-n). The regular outcome of the Proto-Semitic etymon is Arabic زَمَن(zaman), however. The form with a long vowel was perhaps borrowed through Middle Persian or another language. Compare Persian زمان(zamân) below for more.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

زَمَان (zamānm (plural أَزْمِنَة(ʾazmina))

  1. (uncountable and countable) time
    Coordinate term: مَكَان(makān)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Maltese: żmien

ReferencesEdit

  • Freytag, Georg (1833), “زمان”, in Lexicon arabico-latinum praesertim ex Djeuharii Firuzabadiique et aliorum Arabum operibus adhibitis Golii quoque et aliorum libris confectum, volume 2, Halle: C. A. Schwetschke, page 256
  • Wehr, Hans (1979), “زمن”, in J. Milton Cowan, editor, A Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, 4th edition, Ithaca, NY: Spoken Language Services, →ISBN, page 444

MalayEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Persian زمان(zamân).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

زمان (Rumi spelling zaman‎, plural زمان٢‎)

  1. age (particular period of time in history)

PersianEdit

 
Persian Wikipedia has an article on:
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle Persian [Book Pahlavi needed] (ODNA), [Book Pahlavi needed] (ẕmʾn'), [Book Pahlavi needed] (zmn'), 𐫉𐫖𐫀𐫗(zmʾn /zamān/), from Akkadian 𒋛𒈠𒉡 (zimān; simanu), from Proto-Semitic *zaman-. Compare Parthian 𐫋𐫖𐫀𐫗(jmʾn /žamān/), Gurani ژەمەن(žaman, meal), Central Kurdish ژەم(žam, meal), and Iranian borrowings Old Armenian ժաման (žaman), ժամանակ (žamanak).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Dari Persian زمان
Iranian Persian
Tajik замон (zamon)

زمان (zamân)

  1. time (referring to a broad time period like epoch, period, season, etc. It is not the type of time that one reads from a watch or a clock)
  2. (physics) time
  3. season
  4. epoch
  5. (grammar) tense
  6. death

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Kaufman, Stephen A. (1974) The Akkadian Influences on Aramaic (The Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago Assyriological Studies; 19)‎[1], Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, →ISBN, pages 91–92