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JapaneseEdit

Kanji in this term

Grade: 1
はや
Grade: 1
ふ > ぶ
Grade: S
kun’yomi

EtymologyEdit

From Old Japanese.

The 連体形 (rentaikei, attributive form) of classical verb 千早ぶ (chihayabu, to move or act ferociously, with terrible godly power).[1][2][3]

The use of 振る or 降る to spell furu is an example of phonetic ateji (当て字).

PronunciationEdit

AdnominalEdit

千早振る (hiragana ちはやぶる, rōmaji chihayaburu)

  1. allusion to 宇治 (Uji, a placename, especially of a river crossing)
    from the sense of “ferocious, violent, raging” used in reference to a specific (uji, family, clan), then punning off the “clan” reading of uji
  2. allusion to various (kami, Shinto deities) or words beginning with kami
    from the sense of “ferocious, impassionate, mighty” used in reference to various kami
  3. allusion to 伊豆 (Izu, a placename)
    by extension from the “ferocious, mighty” sense in reference to the awesome power of kami, punning off the synonym 稜威 (itsu, awesome power) to refer to Izu
  4. allusion to terms related to kami such as 斎垣 (igaki, fence enclosing a shrine), 天の岩戸 (ama no iwato, cave where Amaterasu retreated), 玉の簾 (tama no sudare, jeweled bamboo screen), etc.
  5. allusion to famous Shinto shrines such as 賀茂 (Kamo), 平野 (Hirano), 三上山 (Mikamiyama), 香椎の宮 (Kashii no miya), 布留 (Furu), 斎宮 (Itsuki no miya), etc.

CitationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:千早振る.

Usage notesEdit

See alsoEdit

Proper nounEdit

 
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Wikipedia ja

千早振る (hiragana ちはやぶる, rōmaji Chihayaburu)

  1. the title of a rakugo shaggy-dog story
    from the interpretation of the chihayaburu poem by Ariwara no Narihira (Kokin Wakashū, book 5, poem 294; Hyakunin Isshu, poem 17) as symbolic of hardships
    Synonyms: 竜田川 (Tatsuta-gawa), 百人一首 (Hyakunin Isshu), 無学者 (Mugakusha), 無学者論 (Mugakusha-ron)
  2. Synonym of 千早の歌 (Chihaya no uta): a poem used as an insect repellent
    from the first line of the poem: 千早振る卯月八日... (chihayaburu uzuki yōka wa...)

Usage notesEdit

Some sources may list the rakugo title as Chihayafuru, with an unvoiced -furu ending. This could have been the historical reading at the time of the story's composition in the late 1700s. However, the historical reading is unclear, as marking of 濁音 (dakuon, voicing) was inconsistent prior to the spelling reforms of the 20th century.

NounEdit

千早振る (hiragana ちはやぶる, rōmaji chihayaburu)

  1. (historical, rare) something old, something that has been around for a long time
    • 16031604, Nippo Jisho (page 109)[4]
      Chiuayafuru. i. Couſa antigua, ou de muito tempo: Xintǒ.
    likely an extension of the adnominal allusion to kami
    Synonym: (mukashi)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1988, 国語大辞典(新装版) (Kokugo Dai Jiten, Revised Edition) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan
  2. ^ 1995, 大辞泉 (Daijisen) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan, →ISBN
  3. ^ 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN
  4. ^ 1603, 日葡辞書: パリ本 / Vocabulario da Lingoa Iapam (Nippo Jisho: Paris edition / Vocabulary of the Language of Japan) (in Japanese and Portuguese), 1976 reprint, Tōkyō: Bensei Publishing, text here

Old JapaneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in the Kojiki (712 CE).

The 連体形 (rentaikei, attributive form) of verb 千早ぶ (tipayabu, to move or act ferociously, with terrible godly power).

AdnominalEdit

千早振る (tipayaburu) (kana ちはやぶる)

  1. allusion to 宇治 (Udi, a placename, especially of a river crossing)
    from the sense of “ferocious, violent, raging” used in reference to a specific (udi, family, clan), then punning off the “clan” reading of udi
  2. allusion to various (kami2, Shinto deities)
    from the sense of “ferocious, impassionate, mighty” used in reference to various kami

CitationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:千早振る.

DescendantsEdit

  • Japanese: 千早振る (chihayaburu)