See also:
U+5CF0, 峰
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-5CF0

[U+5CEF]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+5CF1]

TranslingualEdit

Han characterEdit

(radical 46, +7, 10 strokes, cangjie input 山竹水十 (UHEJ), four-corner 27754, composition)

Derived charactersEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • KangXi: page 311, character 31
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 8094
  • Dae Jaweon: page 612, character 1
  • Hanyu Da Zidian (first edition): volume 1, page 775, character 18
  • Unihan data for U+5CF0

ChineseEdit

trad. /
simp.

Glyph originEdit

Phono-semantic compound (形聲, OC *pʰoŋ): semantic (mountain) + phonetic (OC *pʰoŋ, *boŋ, *ɡaːds).

PronunciationEdit


Note:
  • hong - literary;
  • pang - vernacular.

Rime
Character
Reading # 1/1
Initial () (2)
Final () (7)
Tone (調) Level (Ø)
Openness (開合) Open
Division () III
Fanqie
Reconstructions
Zhengzhang
Shangfang
/pʰɨoŋ/
Pan
Wuyun
/pʰioŋ/
Shao
Rongfen
/pʰioŋ/
Edwin
Pulleyblank
/pʰuawŋ/
Li
Rong
/pʰioŋ/
Wang
Li
/pʰĭwoŋ/
Bernard
Karlgren
/pʰi̯woŋ/
Expected
Mandarin
Reflex
fēng
Zhengzhang system (2003)
Character
Reading # 1/1
No. 3225
Phonetic
component
Rime
group
Rime
subdivision
0
Corresponding
MC rime
Old
Chinese
/*pʰoŋ/
Notes

DefinitionsEdit

  1. peak; summit
  2. hump (of a camel)
  3. Classifier for camels.

CompoundsEdit


JapaneseEdit

KanjiEdit

(common “Jōyō” kanji)

ReadingsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Kanji in this term

Grade: S
kun’yomi

/wo//o/

From Old Japanese. Attested in the Man'yōshū.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

() (o (wo)?

  1. (obsolete) a small place in the mountain
  2. (obsolete) hill, hilltop
    c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 19, poem 4151), text here
    今日(けふ)()(ため)()(おもひ)(しめ)()(あし)(ひき)()(をの)()()(さくら)如此(かく)(さき)尓家里(にけり) [Man'yōgana]
    ()()のためと(おも)ひて(しめ)しあしひきの()()(さくら)かく()きにけり [Modern spelling]
    kyō no tame to omoite shimeshi ashihiki no onoe no sakura kaku saki ni keri
    For the sake of today's feast I thought and put up a sign. The cherry of the foot-dragging hill-tops has come to blossom thus.[1]
  3. (obsolete) peak, ridge
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Kanji in this term

Grade: S
kun’yomi

From Old Japanese. Used mainly in compounds.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

() (ne

  1. summit of a mountain, peak
    c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 14, poem 3515), text here
    阿我於毛乃(あがおもの)和須礼牟之太波(わすれむしだは)久尓波布利(くにはふり)()尓多都久毛乎(にたつくもを)見都追之努波西(みつつしのはせ) [Man'yōgana]
    ()(おも)(わす)れむしだは(くに)はふり()()(くも)()つつ(しの)はせ [Modern spelling]
    aga omo no wasuremu shida wa kuni wa furi ne ni tatsukumo o mitsutsu shinowase
    The moment you might forget my face, seeing the clouds overflowing the country and rising on the peaks, think of me![3]

Etymology 3Edit

Kanji in this term
みね
Grade: S
kun’yomi

From () (mi, honorific prefix) + () (ne, peak)[2], in reference to the (kami, god or spirit) at the top of a mountain. Now the standard spelling for a peak.

Compare (michi, road).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(みね) (mine

  1. peak, ridge
    912, Kokin Wakashū, poem 365 (also Hyakunin Isshu, poem 16)
    ()(わか)れいなばの(やま)(みね)()ふるまつとし()かば(いま)(かへ)()
    tachi-wakare Inaba-no-yama no mine ni ouru matsu to shi kikaba ima kaeri-kon
    Even if I depart and go to Inaba Mountain, on whose peak grow pines, if I hear you pine for me, I will return straightway to you.[4]
    912, Kokin Wakashū, poem 776 (also Hyakunin Isshu, poem 13)
    (つく)()()(みね)より()つるみなの(がは)(こひ)()もりて(ふち)となりぬる
    Tsukuba-ne no mine yori otsuru Minano-gawa koi zo tsumorite fuchi to nari nuru
    Falling from the ridge of high Tsukuba, the Minano River at last gathers itself, like my love, into a deep, still pool.[5]
  2. (by extension) top or summit of something
  3. back of a blade

Proper nounEdit

(みね) (Mine

  1. A place name
  2. A female given name
  3. A surname​.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jan Lodewijk Pierson, Jr. (1963) The Manyôśû Translated and Annotated Book XIX, Brill Archive, page 14
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN
  3. ^ Jan Lodewijk Pierson, Jr. (1958) The Manyôśû Translated and Annotated Book XX, Brill Archive, page 74
  4. ^ Joshua S. Mostow (1996) Pictures of the Heart: The Hyakunin Isshu in Word and Image, University of Hawaii Press, →ISBN, page 190
  5. ^ Kenneth Rexroth (1964) One Hundred Poems from the Japanese, New Directions Publishing, →ISBN, page 103

KoreanEdit

HanjaEdit

(bong) (hangeul , revised bong, McCune–Reischauer pong)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

CompoundsEdit


VietnameseEdit

Han characterEdit

: Hán Nôm readings: phong

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.