U+B124, 네
HANGUL SYLLABLE NE
Composition: +

[U+B123]
Hangul Syllables
[U+B125]
See also: -네




너 ←→ 녀

JejuEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See Korean (ne).

DeterminerEdit

(ne)

  1. four

Etymology 2Edit

See Korean (nae).

NounEdit

(ne)

  1. smoke

ReferencesEdit

  • ” in Jeju's culture and language, Digital museum.

KoreanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

First attested in the Jīlín lèishì (鷄林類事 / 계림유사), 1103, as Late Old Korean  (Yale: *nay).

In the Hangul script, first attested in the Yongbi eocheonga (龍飛御天歌 / 용비어천가), 1447, as Middle Korean 네〯 (Yale: něy).

Beyond Middle Korean, the reconstruction of the ancestral Koreanic root for "four" is difficult. See a list of relevant attestations and forms in Appendix:Historical Koreanic numerals#Four.

PronunciationEdit

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ne̞(ː)]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ne
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ne
McCune–Reischauer?ne
Yale Romanization?nēy

DeterminerEdit

Korean numbers (edit)
40
[a], [b], [c] ←  3 4 5  → [a], [b]
    Native isol.: (net)
    Native attr.: (ne), (neok) (dated), (neo) (archaic)
    Sino-Korean: (sa)
    Hanja:
    Ordinal: 넷째 (netjjae)

(ne)

  1. (native numeral) four (of something)
    학생 haksaeng ne myeongfour students
    비둘기 마리bidulgi ne marifour pigeons
    그림 있습니다.Ne gae-ui geurim-i itseumnida.There are four pictures.
Usage notesEdit

In modern Korean, numbers are usually written in Arabic numerals.

The Korean language has two sets of numerals: a native set of numerals inherited from Old Korean, and a Sino-Korean set which was borrowed from Middle Chinese in the first millennium C.E.

Native classifiers take native numerals.

Some Sino-Korean classifiers take native numerals, others take Sino-Korean numerals, while yet others take both.

Recently loaned classifiers generally take Sino-Korean numerals.

For many terms, a native numeral has a quantifying sense, whereas a Sino-Korean numeral has a sense of labeling.

  • 반(班) (se ban, three school classes, native numeral)
  • 반(班) (sam ban, Class Number Three, Sino-Korean numeral)

When used in isolation, native numerals refer to objects of that number and are used in counting and quantifying, whereas Sino-Korean numerals refer to the numbers in a more mathematical sense.

  • 하나 주세 (hana-man deo juse-yo, Could you give me just one more, please, native numeral)
  • 더하기 ? (Il deohagi ir-eun?, What's one plus one?, Sino-Korean numeral)

While older stages of Korean had native numerals up to the thousands, native numerals currently exist only up to ninety-nine, and Sino-Korean is used for all higher numbers. There is also a tendency—particularly among younger speakers—to uniformly use Sino-Korean numerals for the higher tens as well, so that native numerals such as 일흔 (ilheun, “seventy”) or 아흔 (aheun, “ninety”) are becoming less common.

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from the same source as (ye), plausibly *녜 (*nye) (apparently not directly attested).

PronunciationEdit

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [ne̞(ː)]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ne
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ne
McCune–Reischauer?ne
Yale Romanization?nēy

InterjectionEdit

(ne)

  1. (polite) yes
    , 습니다.Ne, al-get-seumnida.Yes, I understand.
Usage notesEdit
  • Korean has a number of words for "yes". (ye) is highly polite and formal, appropriate in an interview; (ne) is polite but less formal, appropriate in a conversation with parents; and (eung) and (eo) are plain and non-formal, appropriate in a conversation with friends.

Etymology 3Edit

Contractions of:

  • (nominative): (neo, you) +‎ (-i, nominative case marker), which is no longer grammatically accepted.
  • (genitive): (neo, you) +‎ (-ui, genitive case marker).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ni/ne
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ni/ne
McCune–Reischauer?ni/ne
Yale Romanization?ni/ney

PronounEdit

(ne)

  1. Form of (neo, you):
    1. Only used in 네가 (nega): the nominative form of (neo, you).
    2. your; genitive of (neo, you).
Usage notesEdit
  • Usually pronounced (ni) to avoid homophony with (nae, I, me; my). The (ne) pronunciation is still used in reading literature, songs, etc.
  • (nominative): (neo-ga) is increasingly common.
  • (genitive): (neo) used attributively, without any genitive marking, is also common.

Etymology 4Edit

Related to 누구 (nugu), possibly descended from 뉘〯 (Yale: nwǔy).

PronounEdit

(ne)

  1. (Koryo-mar) who, whom
    야 너는 네 덕에 사는가? (Koryo-mar, Tashkent)
    Ya neoneun ne deoge saneun'ga?
    hey, who do you live for?