TranslingualEdit

EtymologyEdit

New Latin, from Latin -ia and Ancient Greek -ία (-ía), -εια (-eia), which form abstract nouns of feminine gender.

SuffixEdit

-ia f

  1. Used to form taxonomic names, especially to form genus names when appended to the name of a person, usually a scientist or a patron.

Derived termsEdit


EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin -ia and Ancient Greek -ία (-ía), -εια (-eia), which form abstract nouns of feminine gender.

SuffixEdit

-ia

  1. Used in forming names of countries, diseases, flowers, and rarely collections of things (such as militaria, deletia).
SynonymsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From the endings of corresponding Latin and Ancient Greek plural nouns.

SuffixEdit

-ia

  1. Used in forming plurals of nouns in -ium and -ion.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

SuffixEdit

-ia

  1. forms nouns, from adjectives, denoting states, conditions and qualities; -ness; -ity; -y; -hood
    covard (coward) + ‎-ia → ‎covardia (cowardice)
  2. forms the names of offices or jobs; -ship
    comptador (accountant) + ‎-ia → ‎comptadoria (accounting)
  3. forms placenames; -y; -ia
    occità (Occitan) + ‎-ia → ‎Occitània (Occitanie)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *-idak, from Proto-Uralic *-j-.

SuffixEdit

-ia (front vowel harmony variant -iä)

  1. Forms primarily transitive verbs describing repeating or continuous action.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek -ία (-ía).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈi.a/
  • Hyphenation: -ìa

SuffixEdit

-ia f (plural -ie)

  1. Derives abstract nouns denoting a state or condition from adjectives or nouns
    allegro (cheerful”, “happy) + ‎-ia → ‎allegria (joy”, “happiness)
    tiranno (tyrant) + ‎-ia → ‎tirannia (tyranny)
  2. Derives abstract nouns denoting a collective group or a social condition
    compagno (companion) + ‎-ia → ‎compagnia (company)
    borghese (bourgeois) + ‎-ia → ‎borghesia (bourgeoisie)
  3. Added to ethnonyms to derive place names
    andaluso (Andalusian) + ‎-ia → ‎Andalusia (Andalusia)
  4. Used to derive technical and scientific terms, especially from Ancient Greek terms

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Partially from Ancient Greek -ίᾱ (-íā), -ία (-ía) and -εια (-eia), and so ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *-i-eh₂. This suffix may also represent a substantivization of the feminine form of -ius.

SuffixEdit

-ia f (genitive -iae); first declension

  1. Used to form a feminine abstract noun, usually from an adjective in (-us), or (rarely in later Latin) (-ius), or from a present participle stem, and occasionally from a root noun.
    with adjectives and participles:
    dēmēns + ‎-ia → ‎dēmentia
    valēns + ‎-ia → ‎valentia
    fācundus + ‎-ia → ‎fācundia
    ignāvus + ‎-ia → ‎ignāvia
    opulentus + ‎-ia → ‎opulentia
    gōgrāvius + ‎-ia → ‎gōgrāvia (Medieval Latin)
    with nouns:
    custōs + ‎-ia → ‎custōdia
    mīles + ‎-ia → ‎mīlitia
    victor + ‎-ia → ‎victōria

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative -ia -iae
Genitive -iae -iārum
Dative -iae -iīs
Accusative -iam -iās
Ablative -iā -iīs
Vocative -ia -iae

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Old French: -ie
    • Middle French: -ie
    • Middle High German: -ie
    • Middle English: -ie

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

SuffixEdit

-ia f

  1. forms nouns, from adjectives, denoting states, conditions and qualities; -ness; -ity; -y; -hood
    alegre (joyful) + ‎-ia → ‎alegria (joy)
    Synonyms: -idade, -ção
  2. (medicine) forms the names of medical conditions; -y; -ia
    acéfalo (acephalous) + ‎-ia → ‎acefalia (acephaly)
  3. forms the names of offices or jobs; -ship
    governador (governor) + ‎-ia → ‎governadoria (the job or office of a governor)
    Synonyms: -ado, -ato
  4. forms placenames; -y; -ia
    Brasil (Brazil) + ‎-ia → ‎Brasília (Brasilia)

Etymology 2Edit

SuffixEdit

-ia

  1. appended to the stem, forms the first-person singular and third-person singular imperfect indicative of 2nd and 3rd conjugation verbs
    comer (to eat) + ‎-ia → ‎comia (I/he/she/it ate)

Etymology 3Edit

SuffixEdit

-ia

  1. appended to the infinitive, forms the first-person singular and third-person singular conditional of verbs
    comer (to eat) + ‎-ia → ‎comeria (I/he/she/it would eat)



SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

SuffixEdit

-ia f (plural -ias)

  1. appears in feminine nouns, generally abstract, mostly inherited from Latin; -y
    eficaz (efficient) + ‎-ia → ‎eficacia (efficiency)
  2. forms placenames; -y; -ia
    Brasil (Brazil) + ‎-ia → ‎Brasilia (Brasilia)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwahiliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-ia

  1. for (directed at, intended to belong to)

Usage notesEdit

Used to form benefactive and additive verbs from other verbs (either of Bantu or Arabic origin), e.g., lipa (pay) → lipia (pay for); jibu (answer) → jibia (answer to/for). This affix is subject to vowel harmony: verbs with root vowels /e/ and /o/ take -ea, e.g., soma (read) → somea (read to/for s.o).

Derived termsEdit