English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Variant spelling of -y.

Pronunciation edit

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. Forming diminutive or affectionate forms of nouns or names.
    • 1869, Louisa May Alcott, An Old-Fashioned Girl:
      "Polly, I wish you 'd let me call you Marie," said Fanny one day, as they were shopping together.
      "You may call me Mary, if you like; but I won't have any ie put on to my name. I'm Polly at home and I'm fond of being called so; but Marie is Frenchified and silly."
      "I spell my own name with an ie, and so do all the girls."
      "And what a jumble of Netties, Nellies, Hatties, and Sallies there is. How 'Pollie' would look spelt so!"
    deardearie
    sweetsweetie
    smilesmilie (also smiley)
    CatherineCathie (also Cathi, Cathy); KatherineKathie (also Kathi, Kathy)
    BillBillie (also Billi, Billy)
  2. (occasionally derogatory) Forming colloquial nouns signifying the person associated with suffixed noun or verb.
    bikebikie
    roadroadie
    surfsurfie
    towntownie
  3. Obsolete spelling of -y

Usage notes edit

The -ie spelling is more common than -y when used to create words for people. Thus hippie is preferred over hippy.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch -je.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /i/
  • (file)

Suffix edit

-ie (plural -ies)

  1. Forms a diminutive noun

Usage notes edit

  • The suffix -ie is used in nouns that end in -b, -f, -g, -k, -p, -s. Nouns ending in other sounds use one of the alternative forms above.

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Suffix edit

-ie f (noun-forming suffix)

  1. a suffix denoting a branch of science or study, similar to -ics
    Synonym: -ika

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Dutch -ie, ultimately from Latin -ia.

Suffix edit

-ie f

  1. A variant of -ij
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Ultimately from Latin -iō.

Suffix edit

-ie f

  1. -ion, -y
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

An alteration of je in popular speech.

Suffix edit

-ie n

  1. (Netherlands, informal) A variant of -je, a suffix forming diminutive nouns and informal adjectives.
Derived terms edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin -ia, a suffix used to create abstract nouns, and from Ancient Greek -ία (-ía), -εια (-eia).

Pronunciation edit

Suffix edit

-ie f (plural -ies)

  1. indicates a feminine noun, often an abstract one

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. vocative masculine singular of -ius

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Old French -ie, from Latin -ia.

Alternative forms edit

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. A suffix designating abstract or collective nouns, typically of French or Latin origin.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: -y, -ie

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. Alternative form of -y

Etymology 3 edit

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. Alternative form of -yf

Middle French edit

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. indicates a feminine noun, often an abstract one

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

Middle High German edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Old French -ie, from Latin -ia.

Suffix edit

-īe f

  1. used to create female abstract nouns

Descendants edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin -ia; compare -erie.

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. indicates a feminine noun, often an abstract one

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle French: -ie
  • Middle High German: -ie
  • Middle English: -ie

Old Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. Forms adverbs from adjectives
    niewymowny + ‎-ie → ‎niewymownie

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Polish edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /jɛ/
  • Rhymes:
  • Syllabification: ie

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. Forms adverbs from adjectives
    wybitny + ‎-ie → ‎wybitnie

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Probably from Latin -īlia, neuter plural of -īlis. Less likely from Latin -ia. Compare Aromanian -ilji, -ilje.

Pronunciation edit

Suffix edit

-ie f (plural -ii)

  1. Used with a stem to create a (usually abstract) noun relating to it; can be compared to -ship, -hood, -ness, -ity, etc.

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Scots edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English -y, from Old English -iġ, from Proto-West Germanic *-g.

Suffix edit

-ie

  1. Designates an adjective, in many cases formed by being appended to a noun.

References edit