See also: otic

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French -otique, from Latin -ōticus,[1] from Ancient Greek -ωτικός (-ōtikós), from -όω (-óō)-stem verbs[2] + -τικός (-tikós). Equivalent to -όω (-óō) + -σις (-sis) + -ικός (-ikós).

SuffixEdit

-otic

  1. (pathology) Having disease or abnormal condition.
    psychosis + ‎-otic → ‎psychotic
  2. Pertaining to a process or action.
    symbiosis + ‎-otic → ‎symbiotic

Usage notesEdit

Used to form adjectives corresponding to nouns suffixed with -osis.

Derived termsEdit


Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ -otic” in Stuart Berg Flexner, editor in chief, Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2nd rev. and updated edition, New York, N.Y.: Random House, 1993, →ISBN; reproduced on Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  2. ^ -otic” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit