EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English -s, -es, from Old English -es (-'s, masculine and neuter genitive singular ending), which survives in many old compounds. In more recent coinage, from contraction of the derived clitic -'s in compounds. For more, see -'s.

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Genitival interfix used to link elements in some compounds, equivalent to the possessive clitic -'s.
    hogshead, kingsman, yearsworth, womenswear

See alsoEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch -s-.

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. An interfix used to link elements in some compounds, originally a genitival interfix.
    aanleerder (learner) + ‎-s- + ‎woordeboek (dictionary) → ‎aanleerderswoordeboek
    staat (state) + ‎-s- + ‎kaping (hijacking, privateering) → ‎staatskaping

Usage notesEdit

  • Use of the -s- interfix in Afrikaans is based on patterns in the existing vocabulary. It is frequently used after the -ing, -ie and the -er suffixes. It is seldom used following mass nouns.
  • The -s- is not used when the previous element end on s: poskantoor. It is not used when the next element begins with s: stadspoort, but stadsaal (no interfix).

See alsoEdit


AlbanianEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. a consonant that sometimes appears as a ligature between the elements of a compound word.
    plotë (full, adjective) + ‎-s- + ‎-oj (verbal suffix) → ‎plotësoj (I complete; I satisfy, fulfill)

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Interfix inserted in some compounds.

Usage notesEdit

The usage of fuge-s is phonetically motivated. It is applied on a per-modifier basis, meaning that if the first root generates fuge-s in one compound, it will usually do so in all compounds, even if the second already begins with an s, as in dødsstraf (død + straf) or affaldssæk (affald + sæk).

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Genitival interfix used to link elements in some compounds.
    dood (dead) + ‎-s- + ‎kist (chest) → ‎doodskist
    ezel (donkey) + ‎-s- + ‎brug (bridge) + ‎-etje (diminutive suffix) → ‎ezelsbruggetje

Derived termsEdit


ElfdalianEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Genitival interfix indicating that the former part is a characteristic of the latter.

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Genitival interfix used to link elements in some compounds.
    Gestein (rock) + ‎-s- + ‎Formation (formation) → ‎Gesteinsformation (geological formation)
    Arbeit (work) + ‎-s- + ‎Zimmer (room) → ‎Arbeitszimmer (workroom, study)

Usage notesEdit

  • This interfix is used regularly after most derivational suffixes such as -heit, -ling, -tum, -ung, including borrowed ones like -ität, -tion. Otherwise it is used only after a minority of words. Most of these are strong masculine and neuter nouns, but not without exception (cf. Arbeit f above). There also words that use it in some compounds but not in others, e.g. Arbeitszimmer, Arbeitgeber, Darlehensgeber.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


NavajoEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. a consonant that sometimes appears as a ligature between the elements of a compound word.
    bįįh + ‎-s- + ‎tsoh → ‎bįįstsoh

See alsoEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Genitival interfix indicating that the former part is a characteristic of the latter.

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Genitival interfix indicating that the former part is a characteristic of the latter.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a genitival suffix, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *-as. Cognates include German -s- and Dutch -s-.

PronunciationEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Used to link two elements in some compounds.

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterfixEdit

-s-

  1. Genitival interfix indicating that the former part is a characteristic of the latter.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit