See also: 911, 9・11, and 9-1-1




From the date September 11 written in numbers according the format used in the United States, which puts the month before the day.


Usage notesEdit

  • /naɪn.wʌnˈwʌn/ is usually used for the telephone number 911 instead of the date.

Alternative formsEdit

Proper nounEdit


  1. The date of the attack on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon in the USA, September 11th, 2001.
  2. The attack itself.
    • 2014 November 17, Roger Cohen, “The horror! The horror! The trauma of ISIS [print version: International New York Times, 18 November 2014, p. 9]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      What is unbearable, in fact, is the feeling, 13 years after 9/11, that America has been chasing its tail; that, in some whack-a-mole horror show, the quashing of a jihadi enclave here only spurs the sprouting of another there; that the ideology of Al Qaeda is still reverberating through a blocked Arab world whose Sunni-Shia balance (insofar as that went) was upended by the American invasion of Iraq.



9/11 ‎(plural 9/11s)

  1. An event comparable to 9/11.
    • 2005 , Peter H. Merkl, The Rift Between America And Old Europe: The Distracted Eagle, Routledge, page 73.
      Eleven million Spaniards responded to "their 9/11" by demonstrating in the rain against terrorism and their government's policies.
    • 2006, The Age[2]
      Moussaoui says he wants more 9/11s
    • 2006, Michael Weissenstein, "Nations respond to their '9/11s'"[3]
      But experts who have studied these other "9/11s" say some offer important revelations, by comparison, about how America responded to its own.
    • 2007, David E. Long, Bernard Reich, Mark Gasiorowski, The Government and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa.
      Jordanians referred to this horrific event as "their 9-11 ".

See alsoEdit