Andreas

See also: Andreaš

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ἀνδρέας (Andréas), cognate with ἀνδρεῖος (andreîos, manly), both from ἀνήρ (anḗr, man). Doublet of Andrew.

Proper nounEdit

Andreas

  1. A male given name from Ancient Greek from the Latin form of Andrew.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Proper nounEdit

Andreas

  1. Andrew (biblical figure)
  2. A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • [2] Danskernes Navne, based on CPR data: 37 684 males with the given name Andreas have been registered in Denmark between about 1890 (=the population alive in 1967) and January 2005, with the frequency peak in the 1990s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Ancient Greek Ἀνδρέας (Andréas). This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɑnˈdreː.ɑs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: An‧dre‧as

Proper nounEdit

Andreas m

  1. Andrew (apostle, brother of the apostle Peter)
  2. A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

Proper nounEdit

Andreas

  1. Andrew (biblical figure)
  2. A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew

Related termsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑndreɑs/, [ˈɑndre̞ɑs̠]
  • Rhymes: -ɑndreɑs
  • Syllabification: And‧re‧as

Proper nounEdit

Andreas

  1. Andrew (the Apostle).
  2. (rare) A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of Andreas (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative Andreas Andreakset
genitive Andreaksen Andreasten
Andreaksien
partitive Andreasta Andreaksia
illative Andreakseen Andreaksiin
singular plural
nominative Andreas Andreakset
accusative nom. Andreas Andreakset
gen. Andreaksen
genitive Andreaksen Andreasten
Andreaksien
partitive Andreasta Andreaksia
inessive Andreaksessa Andreaksissa
elative Andreaksesta Andreaksista
illative Andreakseen Andreaksiin
adessive Andreaksella Andreaksilla
ablative Andreakselta Andreaksilta
allative Andreakselle Andreaksille
essive Andreaksena Andreaksina
translative Andreakseksi Andreaksiksi
instructive Andreaksin
abessive Andreaksetta Andreaksitta
comitative Andreaksineen
Possessive forms of Andreas (type vastaus)
possessor singular plural
1st person Andreakseni Andreaksemme
2nd person Andreaksesi Andreaksenne
3rd person Andreaksensa

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [anˈdʀeːas]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: An‧dre‧as

Proper nounEdit

Andreas m (genitive Andreas or Andreas', plural Andreasse)[1]

  1. Andrew (biblical figure)
  2. A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew

Usage notesEdit

  • The genitive Andreas can be used after the article des (masculine genitive singular).

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Proper nounEdit

Andreas f

  1. genitive singular of Andrea

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from the Ancient Greek Ἀνδρέᾱς (Andréās).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /anˈdreː.aːs/, [an̪ˈd̪ɾeː.aːs̠] or IPA(key): /ˈan.dre.aːs/, [ˈan̪.d̪ɾe.aːs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /anˈdre.as/, [an̪ˈd̪rɛː.as] or IPA(key): /ˈan.dre.as/, [ˈan̪.d̪rɛ.as]
  • Note: the originally short vowel always scans long in late dactylic poetry to fit the meter.[1] This pronunciation likely gained currency under the Empire in order to imitate Greek stress, parallel to -ia, and is the only one reflected by Romance.

Proper nounEdit

Andrē̆ās m sg (genitive Andrē̆ae); first declension

  1. A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew
    1. Andrew (biblical figure)

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun (masculine Greek-type with nominative singular in -ās), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Andrē̆ās
Genitive Andrē̆ae
Dative Andrē̆ae
Accusative Andrē̆am
Andrē̆ān
Ablative Andrē̆ā
Vocative Andrē̆ā

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: Andreu
  • French: André
  • Galician: André, Andrade
  • Italian: Andrea
  • Old Portuguese: Andreu

ReferencesEdit

“Andreās” in volume {{{2}}} column {{{3}}} line {{{4}}} in the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (2009). Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter.

  1. ^ Pede Certo - Digital Latin Metre[1], 2011

ManxEdit

Proper nounEdit

Andreas m

  1. A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew

Related termsEdit


NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgate Latin Andreas. First recorded as a given name in Norway in the 12th century.

Proper nounEdit

Andreas

  1. Andrew (biblical figure)
  2. A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, →ISBN
  • [3] Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 19 793 males with the given name Andreas living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with frequency peaks in the 19th century and in the 1990s. Accessed on April 29th, 2011.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Andreas, of Ancient Greek origin. First recorded in Sweden in runes in the 12th century.

Proper nounEdit

Andreas c (genitive Andreas, Andreas')

  1. Andrew (biblical figure)
  2. A male given name from Ancient Greek, equivalent to English Andrew
    Det där är Andreas hund.
    That's Andreas's dog.
    Andreas och Andrea har varsin hund men Andreas' är störst.
    Andreas and Andrea has each got a dog, but Andreas's is the biggest.
  3. genitive of Andrea

Related termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

The genitive form with an apostrophe is generally only to be used when you need to tell the genitive of Andreas and Andrea apart, see the usage examples above.

ReferencesEdit

  • Roland Otterbjörk: Svenska förnamn, Almqvist & Wiksell 1996, →ISBN
  • [4] Statistiska centralbyrån and Sture Allén, Staffan Wåhlin, Förnamnsboken, Norstedts 1995, →ISBN: 70 686 males with the given name Andreas living in Sweden on December 31st, 2010, with the frequency peak in the 1980s. Accessed on 19 June 2011.

AnagramsEdit