Antiochian

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Antioch +‎ -ian.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌæntiˈɒkiən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌæntiˈoʊkiən/, IPA(key): /ˌæntiˈɑkiən/
  • Hyphenation: An‧ti‧o‧chi‧an

AdjectiveEdit

Antiochian (comparative more Antiochian, superlative most Antiochian)

  1. Of or pertaining to ancient Antioch.
    Synonym: Antiochene
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Antiochian (plural Antiochians)

  1. (historical) A person from, or an inhabitant of, ancient Antioch.
    • 1876, Palestine and Syria[1], page 548:
      Pompey erected the place into a free city for refusing to receive the Armenian King Tigranes, whom the Antiochians had summoned to their aid.
    Synonym: Antiochene
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Antiochus +‎ -ian.

AdjectiveEdit

Antiochian (comparative more Antiochian, superlative most Antiochian)

  1. Pertaining to Antiochus of Ascalon, a contemporary with Cicero, and the founder of a sect of philosophers.
TranslationsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for Antiochian in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)