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See also: cato, CATO, cató, and Cató

Contents

EnglishEdit

 Cato (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin Cato. A cognomen made particularly famous by Cato the Elder and Younger, members of the gens Porcia.

Proper nounEdit

Cato

  1. (rare) A male given name
  2. A town and a village in New York.
  3. A town in Wisconsin.

Etymology 2Edit

From French Catherine. Used as a matronymic.

Proper nounEdit

Cato

  1. A surname​.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

According to De Vaan, from catus (intelligent).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Catō m (genitive Catōnis); third declension

  1. A cognomen, particularly a branch of the gens Porcia.

DeclensionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular
nominative Catō
genitive Catōnis
dative Catōnī
accusative Catōnem
ablative Catōne
vocative Catō

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Căto in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) Cato of Utica was a direct descendant of Cato the Censor: Cato Uticensis ortus erat a Catone Censorio
  • Cato in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Căto” on page 276/1 of Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Catō” on page 286/1 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)

NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Cato.

Proper nounEdit

Cato

  1. A male given name popular in the 1970s and 1980s.