See also: golf and gólf

TranslingualEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English golf

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Golf

  1. Code word for the letter G in the NATO/ICAO spelling alphabet

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mistranscribed "[ɡʌlf]" in IPA, but correctly as "GOLF" in English respelling. Annex 10 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation: Aeronautical Telecommunications; Volume II Communication Procedures including those with PANS status[1], 6th edition, International Civil Aviation Organization, October 2001, retrieved 23 January 2019, page §5.2.1.3, Figure 5–1

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔlf/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Italian golfo, from Late Latin colfus, from Ancient Greek κόλπος (kólpos). See gulf.

NounEdit

Golf m (genitive Golfs or Golfes, plural Golfe)

  1. (geography) bay, gulf
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English golf, probably from Middle Dutch colve and then a doublet of Kolben.

NounEdit

Golf n (genitive Golfs, no plural)

  1. (sports) golf
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Brandname. Apparently with associations to both above etymologies. Compare the contemporaneous models Jetta (from the jetstream), Passat (from Passattrade wind”) and Polo (from the polo sport).

NounEdit

Golf m (genitive Golfs, plural Golfs or Golfe)

  1. Volkswagen Golf, the most popular car in Germany throughout the 1980s and 1990s
DeclensionEdit

LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Golf m (plural Golfen)

  1. (uncountable) golf (sport)
  2. golf course
  3. gulf (geographical)