Hail Mary

EnglishEdit

 
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NounEdit

Hail Mary (plural Hail Marys or Hail Maries)

  1. (Christianity) A prayer calling for the intercession of the Virgin Mary.
    Synonyms: angelic salutation, ave, Ave Maria
    • 1872, F. A., chapter V, in Marion Howard; or Trials and Triumphs, Philadelphia: Peter F. Cunningham, [], page 100:
      “What did the priest, and all of you, keep on saying when we first went in?” / “Our Fathers, Hail Maries, and Glorias; couldn’t you hear?” asked Emily, laughing. / “No, I should think not, you rattled on so fast- What are Hail Maries and Glorias?” / “The Gloria you know well enough, my dear, because you say it in your church at the end of every psalm,” replied Miss Horton; “the Hail Mary is a prayer to our Blessed Lady,” and she repeated it.
  2. A Hail Mary pass: a risky last-ditch effort with great benefit but little chance of success; one whose success would require divine intervention.
    • 2020 August 30, Londoño, Ernesto, “‘A Hail Mary’: Psychedelic Therapy Draws Veterans to Jungle Retreats”, in The New York Times[1]:

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

Hail Mary (not comparable)

  1. (by extension to nouns other than "pass") Desperate; riskily attempting to salvage a dire situation
    • 2017 June 13, Geiling, Natasha, “Trump administration files Hail Mary appeal to derail youth climate lawsuit”, in ThinkProgress[2]:

PhraseEdit

Hail Mary

  1. (Christianity) salutation and prayer to the Virgin Mary, as mother of Jesus Christ

VerbEdit

Hail Mary (third-person singular simple present Hail Marys, present participle Hail Marying, simple past and past participle Hail Maryed)

  1. To pray by saying a Hail Mary.
    • 2003, Ray Cranley, Chip Chop Cherry, →ISBN, page 120:
      He Hail Maryed himself to sleep every night and woke up Hail Marying in the morning, and to his amazement and delight it worked.
    • 2015, Pamela DuMond, The Assassin:
      Sister Cecilia Hail Maryed herself and slid back in the room.
    • 2018, Gregory Phillip Jones, 51 Years of Bipolar Disease: A Survivor's Story, →ISBN, page 168:
      I can just imagine a medical examiner standing beside my corpse, pulling the sheet back so as to expose my head and torso, and explaining to a detective, “This poor man Hail Maryed himself to death!”

TranslationsEdit