Inspector Knacker

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Coined by Private Eye as "Knacker of the Yard", a pun on knacker's yard and the practice of referring to Scotland Yard as the Yard.

NounEdit

Inspector Knacker (plural Inspector Knackers)

  1. (Britain, countable or uncountable) A generic police officer, or the police in general.
    You won't be smiling when Inspector Knacker pays you a visit.
    • 2003 June, Lord Goodhart, “Official Report of the Grand Committee on the Extradition Bill”, in parliamentary debates (House of Lords)‎[1], column 349:
      However, just before he is discharged, the French ring up Inspector Knacker and say, "Look, I'm sorry we haven't made it in time, but we absolutely promise you that we will get it to you in another 48 hours, so please arrest this man again, as soon as he is discharged".
    • 2007 January 24, the Editor, “Secretary for Public Safety”, in The Mirror[2]:
      Reid wants to be top of the cops, issuing orders to Inspector Knackers and James Bonds with criminals and terrorists in his sights.
    • 2008, Georgina Pallfey, Working and Living in New Zealand, page 129:
      Please note: Inspector Knacker has been known to query applications by phone in the early hours NZ time, so forewarn your family, friends and flatmates that you are not the subject of an Interpol inquiry.
    • 2012, Chris Payne, Erased!, page 123:
      But, on this occasion, caution wisely stayed his hand and he confined himself to poisoning the Birdas coffee only, reasoning that wiping out an entire Conservative Party Association branch, while desirable from the point of view of most decent folk, might, unfortunately, have the countervailing disadvantage of attracting the attention of Inspector Knacker.