English

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Etymology

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From Mandarin 廣東广东 (Guǎngdōng) Wade–Giles romanization: Kuang³-tung¹.[1][2]

Proper noun

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Kuang-tung

  1. Alternative form of Guangdong
    • 1887, Terrien de Lacouperie, Formosa Notes of MSS., Races and Languages[2], volume 19, London: Trübner and Co., page 450:
      42. The boat population of Canton, also called Tan-Ka otherwise Tan families,² is also known as Kün-lun slaves, and they are said to be connected with some native tribes in the north of the Kuang-tung province, consequently in proximity to the above Kün-lun mountains of Kuangsi.
    • 1966, Luce Boulnois, translated by Dennis Chamberlin, The Silk Road[3], London: George Allen & Unwin, →OCLC, →OL, page 208:
      We know that Italians were trading in the Black Sea ports, and the Arabs in the ports of southern China- in Fu-chien and Kuang-tung. Zayton (Ch'üan-chou in Fu-chien?) is mentioned by Marco Polo as 'the greatest port in the world'.
    • 1967, Herold J. Wiens, Han Chinese Expansion in South China[4], Shoe String Press, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 11:
      Were one to draw a profile of generalized altitudes of the landmass of Ling-nan and Kuei-chou Yun-nan in a southeast-northwest direction, the profile that emerges would represent a step-like formation from the sea to the Tibetan Plateau with five major "steps." The first would represent the Kuang-tung lowlands below about 1500-feet.
    • 1981, Huang Shu-min, Agricultural Degradation Changing Community Systems in Rural Taiwan[5], University Press of America, →ISBN, page 92:
      When Chinese from Fukien and Kuang-tung migrated to Taiwan, this warlike situation was obviously transplanted and was further aggravated by the even less efficient political control of the local government and the unique frontier conditions.
    • 2003, Michael Williams, Deforesting the Earth : From Prehistory to Global Crisis[6], University of Chicago Press, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 122[7], page 139:
      In the southern mountain region the mixed deciduous and evergreen broad-leafed forest were barely touched, and wild elephants and the rhinoceros roamed the malarial jungles of the province of Kuang-tung in the ninth century; but that was to change with migration from the north that reached a new momentum after the tenth century.

Translations

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References

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  1. ^ Guangdong, (Wade-Giles romanization) Kuang-tung, in Encyclopædia Britannica
  2. ^ “Languages Other than English”, in The Chicago Manual of Style[1], Seventeenth edition, University of Chicago Press, 2017, →DOI, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 652:Wade-Giles Postal atlas Pinyin Kuang-tung Kwangtung Guangdong

Further reading

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