See also: narr

Alemannic German

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Etymology

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From Middle High German narre, from Old High German narro, further etymology unknown. Cognate with German Narr, Yiddish נאַר (nar).

Noun

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Narr m

  1. (Uri) fool

References

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German

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Etymology

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From Middle High German narre, from Old High German narro, further etymology unknown. Cognates include Yiddish נאַר (nar), Bavarian Noar, German Low German Narr, Dutch nar, West Frisian nar, Saterland Frisian Naar, Danish nar, Swedish narr.

Pronunciation

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  • (most of Germany, parts of Austria) IPA(key): /nar/, [näɐ̯], [naː]
  • (Austria, parts of southern Germany, Switzerland) IPA(key): /nar/, [när], [nɑr]
  • Homophone: na
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

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Narr m (weak, genitive Narren, plural Narren, feminine Närrin)

  1. (dated) fool (a person being stupid or oblivious to facts)
  2. (historical) jester, fool
  3. carnival enthusiast
    Synonyms: Karnevalist, Fastnachter
  4. Used in compounds to indicate an obsession; freak
    Auto (car) + ‎Narr → ‎Autonarr (car freak)
    Pferd (horse) + ‎Narr → ‎Pferdenarr (horse lover)
    Waffe (weapon) + ‎Narr → ‎Waffennarr (gun nut)

Declension

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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See also

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Further reading

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  • Narr” in Duden online
  • Narr” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

German Low German

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Etymology

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From Middle Low German narre, from Old Saxon *narro, from Proto-West Germanic *narrō. Compare Middle High German narre, from Old High German narro.

Noun

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Narr m (plural Narren)

  1. fool

See also

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Pennsylvania German

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Etymology

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From Middle High German narre, from Old High German narro, further etymology unknown. Cognate with German Narr, Yiddish נאַר (nar).

Noun

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Narr m (plural Narre)

  1. fool