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See also: Q.E.D.

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

InterjectionEdit

QED

  1. Initialism of quod erat demonstrandum. (Latin quod erat demonstrandum for what had to be proved or what was to be demonstrated); placed at the end of a mathematical proof to show that the theorem under discussion is proved.
    • 1999, William Dunham, Euler: The Master of Us All, Mathematical Association of America 1999, p. 64:
      By Cases 1 and 2, we see that any finite collection of 4k – 1 primes cannot contain all such primes. Thus there are infinitely many primes of this type. Q.E.D.

Usage notesEdit

When used to end a mathematical proof, QED is somewhat archaic or traditional; textbooks often use a graphical symbol instead. Further, other languages generally use a vernacular abbreviation, such as French CQFD (ce qu'il fallait démontrer); QED is primarily used in English and Hungarian.

Related termsEdit

  • (what was to be demonstrated): QEF

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

QED

  1. Initialism of quantum electrodynamics.
    • 2011, Brian Cox & Jeff Forshaw, The Quantum Universe, Allen Lane 2011, p. 176:
      QED is the theory that explains how electrically charged particles, like electrons, interact with each other and with particles of light (photons).

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

 
Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la

InitialismEdit

QED

  1. QED (quod erat demonstrandum) Initialism of quod erat demonstrandum.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: QED (quod erat demonstrandum)

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin QED.

InterjectionEdit

QED

  1. (sciences) QED

SynonymsEdit