Robin Hood

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Middle English, from Old French, diminutive of Robert

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

 
Statue of Robin Hood in Nottingham.

Robin Hood

  1. A legendary English outlaw famous for his skill in archery and his vow to defend the poor and the oppressed against established authority.
  2. A village in the Metropolitan Borough of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England (OS grid ref SE3227).
  3. A locality near Drouin, Victoria, Australia.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Robin Hood (plural Robin Hoods)

  1. A criminal or vigilante with similar social tendencies.
    • 1862, Henry T. Spicer, "Black Flags in the Channel", Charles Dickens (editor), All the Year Round (volume 6, page 523)
      There were still nobly-born and accomplished sea-rovers — Robin Hoods of the wave — []
    • 1954, Howard Greenfield (lyricist), Connie Francis (singer), Neil Sedaka (composer), “Stupid Cupid”
      Hey now, go play Robin Hood with somebody else's heart.
    • 2002, Peter Drahos, John Braithwaite, Information Feudalism: Who Owns the Knowledge Economy?
      Of course the story is more interesting and complex than that; there are Robin Hoods of infofeudalism – the Free Software Movement and many groups like Napster.