Open main menu
See also: rome

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English Rome, from Old English Rōm, Rūm, from Proto-Germanic *Rūmō and influenced by Late Latin Rōma ("Rome", "Constantinople"), from Classical Latin Rōma ("Rome"). In Roman mythology, the name was said to derive from Romulus, one of the founders of the city and its first king.

The name appears in a wide range of forms in Middle English, including Rom, Room, Roome, and Rombe as well as Rome; by early modern English, it appeared as Rome, Room, and Roome, with the spelling Rome occurring in Shakespeare and common from the early 18th century on. The final spelling was influenced by Norman, Old French, Anglo-Norman, and Middle French Rome.[1]

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Rome

  1. A city on the Tiber River on the Italian peninsula, the capital of a former empire and of the modern region of Lazio and nation of Italy.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of Iulius Cæsar, I ii 157:
      When could they say (till now) that talk'd of Rome,
      That her wide Walles incompast but one man?
      Now is it Rome indeed, and Roome enough
      When there is in it but one onely man.
    • 1866 December 8, 'Filius Ecclesiæ', Notes & Queries, "Rome:Room", 456 1:
      Within the last thirty weeks I have heard the word Rome pronounced Room by several old-fashioned people in the north of Ireland, some of my own relations among the number. On remonstrating with one of these, she said, "It was always Room when I was at school (say about 1830), and I am too old to change it now."
  2. Ancient Rome; the former Roman Empire; Roman civilization.
  3. The Holy See, the leadership of the Roman Catholic Church, particularly prior to the establishment of the Vatican City in the 19th century.
  4. The Church of Rome, the Roman Catholic Church generally.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch rome

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈroː.mə/
  • (file)

Proper nounEdit

Rome n

  1. Rome

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French Rome, from Latin Rōma.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Rome f

  1. Rome (province)
  2. Rome (city)

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

Proper nounEdit

Rome f

  1. plural of Roma
    le due Rome, the two Romes

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English Rōm, from Latin Rōma.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Rome

  1. Rome (the capital of the Papacy and the Roman Empire)
  2. The Roman Empire.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Rōma.

Proper nounEdit

Rome

  1. Rome (city)

DescendantsEdit